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Thinking is kinda weird
#1

Any other subject....maybe in the right place for this?

 I know there are members here from other countries where English is not the native language.

I often lay in bed thinking then realise I'm thinking in German, which would be  normal if I were German but am British so it sorta gets on my nerves a bit. Yeah I am privileged to be allowed to live in the heath, North Germany which I consider to be the most beautiful place to live, apart from perhaps the lake district.  But do any of you other bilinguals and I know there are plenty of you here have this thinking in a foreign language thingy? I try very hard to stop in fear of losing my identity as a Brit.

Is just kinda really, really weird.



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#2
I am Italian and I moved to London about 11 years ago.
I got to the point where I dream and swear in English, so I would say that this new language is quite radicated in me now. My wife is Chinese/Kiwi and can't speak Italian, so English is also the language of intimacy and the one we speak to our 3 years old kid.

Italian is still my first language though and, even if I admit that I am losing some words here and there, I can still make use of my wide vocabulary and good grammar in that language. I still watch videos and sometimes TV in Italian and frequently speak to family and friends from there to keep my language going.

I have no fear of losing my "Italianity". There are many ways in which the Italian language permeates my life. I am outspoken and sometimes loud, I gesticulate a lot when I speak and I am sure that people understand me better because of that, and, unlike British people, I hate bullshiting when I speak or when I am spoken to. In my brain "no" means no, "yes" means yes, "I think it's quite allright" doesn't mean "It's just bad but I am telling you in a nicer way".

I find that a large part of me is rooted in my Italian language, and I doubt that this part will ever go away. I stopped trying to imitate the Brits, in attitude and accent, more or less when I realised that I could enjoy crossdressing more if I stopped trying to pass for a woman.
Also, the word "Cunt" doesn't make me shiver and I use it freely. I love how the eyes of the people around me pop out of their orbits when I do so. I can also say "Voldemort" without any fear. Fantastic!
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#3

(17-06-2020, 12:18 PM)Shirazmn Wrote: I am Italian and I moved to London about 11 years ago.
I got to the point where I dream and swear in English, so I would say that this new language is quite radicated in me now. My wife is Chinese/Kiwi and can't speak Italian, so English is also the language of intimacy and the one we speak to our 3 years old kid.

Italian is still my first language though and, even if I admit that I am losing some words here and there, I can still make use of my wide vocabulary and good grammar in that language. I still watch videos and sometimes TV in Italian and frequently speak to family and friends from there to keep my language going.

I have no fear of losing my "Italianity". There are many ways in which the Italian language permeates my life. I am outspoken and sometimes loud, I gesticulate a lot when I speak and I am sure that people understand me better because of that, and, unlike British people, I hate bullshiting when I speak or when I am spoken to. In my brain "no" means no, "yes" means yes, "I think it's quite allright" doesn't mean "It's just bad but I am telling you in a nicer way".

I find that a large part of me is rooted in my Italian language, and I doubt that this part will ever go away. I stopped trying to imitate the Brits, in attitude and accent, more or less when I realised that I could enjoy crossdressing more if I stopped trying to pass for a woman.
Also, the word "Cunt" doesn't make me shiver and I use it freely. I love how the eyes of the people around me pop out of their orbits when I do so. I can also say "Voldemort" without any fear. Fantastic!



Cunt is a very nice word but git is better. Short, to the point and very insulting Smile" alt="Smile" title="Smile">

Yeah I found myself forgetting English words but having Netflix has fixed that can now watch in English.

 But sadly lost almost all of my Italian lived in Pordenone with the Cavielere De Lode (bet I spelt almost all of that wrong, was a long time ago) and a year with the Alpini in the Dolomites.....that was an awesome time. But memories of that was when we weren't climbing mountains we spent an unusual amount of time trying to beat each other at volleyball. They also taught us a very strange thing where you violently shake a hand to make sorta finger slapping sound which is apparently a major insult ???? IDK we learned how to do it anyway.



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#4
Oh, volleyball... I miss it so much.
Here in London you only have a choice to play football or football. 
What they taught you is called "la stecca". In gesticulating Italian it means something like "Loser!" or, better, think of Nelson's "ah-ah!" in The Simpsons. Same thing.

I have seen it in the UK and in Germany too, but it is not a repetitive thing (only snap once) and it seems to be a celebratory movement for when you get something done very quickly.
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